The Virus And Beer Festivals

Okay. It’s time to admit defeat and concede that the Trump virus is going to alter life as we know if for months (at a minimum) to come.

I tried to remain optimistic after a scheduled trip to Hilton Head was cancelled in March.

And I kind of just shrugged my shoulders in resignation as the virus sunk my planned European river cruise in early June.

But now shit has gotten real. One of my favorite events every summer is the Breckenridge Summer Beer Fest, set this year for July 11. As I’ve written previously on these pages, it’s hard to top an event that combines a scenic mountain venue, blue skies and sunshine, with the best tasting craft beer from around the state.

Here’s my post from when I attended the festival two years ago.

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Beer And Happy Places

I spent a delightful day last Saturday, July 7, at Breckenridge, attending that community’s annual beer festival. Breckenridge is one of the happiest places I’ve been fortunate enough to visit. And since it’s only about a two hour drive from my home in Woodland Park, Breckenridge is a neat little mountain ski town that serves as a delightful venue for a short get-out-of-town vacation.

And sampling craft beer from about 50 vendors from Colorado and other parts of the United States, while being surrounded by mountains at more than 9,000 feet and with music pumping in the background, certainly adds to the experience.

Since moving to Colorado from Ohio I find I am more inclined to go to these kind of events. I guess it has something to do with the near perfect weather, long stretches of blue sky and sunlight, and low humidity.

Also, the mindset of people living in and visiting Colorado is different. Given the excuse to get outside, they appear all too pleased to take it. Me included.

And when you add beer to the mix, well, it’s a pretty happy place.

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Admittedly, it’s hard to hold a beer festival while at the same time asking people to social distance and wear a face mask. Although it doesn’t appear that the protesters — peaceful or otherwise — who have taken to the streets throughout the country are bound by similar restraints or concerns. I digress.

So I guess it should be no surprise that I learned today that this year’s event has been cancelled.

From the organizers:

Hello Friends!
We have come to the very difficult decision to cancel the Breckenridge Summer Beer Fest 2020. I know that we all wanted this event to happen so bad, but for the sake of all of our partners and the health of the community we are going to cancel this year’s event. We will plan to have the event next year. Please enjoy a beer in the sunshine on July 11th and send us a picture of yourselves drinking it!

Grrrrrrrr!

 

 

 

 

Beer And Happy Places

I spent a delightful day last Saturday, July 7, at Breckenridge, attending that community’s annual beer festival. Breckenridge is one of the happiest places I’ve been fortunate enough to visit. And since it’s only about a two hour drive from my home in Woodland Park, Breckenridge is a neat little mountain ski town that serves as a delightful venue for a short get-out-of-town vacation.

And sampling craft beer from about 50 vendors from Colorado and other parts of the United States, while being surrounded by mountains at more than 9,000 feet and with music pumping in the background, certainly adds to the experience.

IMG_0636

Since moving to Colorado from Ohio I find I am more inclined to go to these kind of events. I guess it has something to do with the near perfect weather, long stretches of blue sky and sunlight, and low humidity.

Also, the mindset of people living in and visiting Colorado is different. Given the excuse to get outside, they appear all too pleased to take it. Me included.

And when you add beer to the mix, well, it’s a pretty happy place.

IMG_0638

A New Journey Begins

Thanks for joining me!

Good company in a journey makes the way seem shorter. — Izaak Walton

post

For years, while living in Ohio, I got up just about every morning and added my musings to a blog: PR On The Run. Then after punching the publish button I hit the concrete in my neighborhood or trails in a nearby national park for a minimum of a four- or five-mile run, generally with a small group of friends whom I’ve know for the better part of three decades.

Then in 2012 my wife, Mary, and I relocated to a small mountain town near Pikes Peak in Southern Colorado, Woodland Park. It’s called the City Above The Clouds. And at about 8,400 feet above sea level the views are majestic and the weather is generally ideal throughout the year.

And I’m still running, although age and altitude have shortened the distances and increased the times. Still, running (or walking and biking for that matter) in a venue that offers blue sky, almost constant sunshine and low humidity is nearly impossible to beat.

But I stopped blogging, figuring that my brain farts would be lost in the swamp of fake news and the increasing partisan and uncivil discourse that now rules politics and just about all media, social or otherwise. Or said another way, I figured that after years of gingerly putting one word after another first on paper and later on a computer screen that I had run out of things to say.

Now I’ve decided that I’m ready to jump back into the fray and offer my views from this perch high in the mountains above the clouds. Mostly, I’m going to write about matters that interest me, upset me, or that I just plain find unusual, funny or important. And from time to time I’m going to add some content to highlight my hometown of Woodland Park and my adopted state of Colorado.

By the way, the quote above by Izaak Walton was part of the WordPress template.

But, hey. It ain’t a bad reference for beginning a new journey.